Emergency Vet In St. Louis, MO

Looking for an emergency vet in St. Louis, MO? Search for your nearest animal hospital below.

      List of Emergency Vets in St. Louis, MO

      JEFFERSON ANIMAL HOSPITAL (ST LOUIS)

      ADDRESS: 2120 S. Jefferson Avenue, St. Louis MO 63104
      TEL: (314) 772-4438
      Proudly nestled between Soulard, Lafayette Square, and Benton Park, Jefferson Animal Hospital is located in a neighborhood known as McKinley Heights.

      ST. LOUIS VETERINARY CENTER

      ADDRESS: 1611 S. Grand Boulevard, St. Louis MO 63104
      TEL: (314) 492-8548
      At St. Louis Veterinary Center, we have been serving the residents of South City by providing all your pet’s needs for decades. Our skilled team has diverse experience, and we always strive to offer unparalleled patient care and customer service.

      CENTRAL WEST END VETERINARY CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 4131 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis MO 63108
      TEL: (314) 320-0004
      Thorough check-ups and preventive care can help alleviate serious health problems. We offer a wide range of veterinary services to keep your companions feeling their best.

      HILLSIDE ANIMAL HOSPITAL (ST LOUIS)

      ADDRESS: 5325 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis MO 63110
      TEL: (314) 645-2141
      Hillside Animal Hospital is a full-service veterinary medical facility, located in St. Louis, MO. The professional and courteous staff at Hillside Animal Hospital seeks to provide the best possible medical care, surgical care and dental care for their highly-valued patients.

      BANFIELD PET HOSPITAL (ST LOUIS)

      ADDRESS: 4621 Chippewa Street, St. Louis MO 63116
      TEL: (314) 773-6700
      In St. Louis, MO, Banfield Pet Hospital provides the quality, caring pet health services that have made our reputation since 1955. Banfield Pet Hospital in St. Louis provides a high standard in veterinary care to the pets that come through our doors.

      WATSON ROAD ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 3725 Watson Road, St. Louis MO 63109
      TEL: (314) 644-1544
      Watson Road Veterinary Clinic is a full service animal hospital . Our staff at Watson Road is experienced in handling all types of conditions and treatments. Beyond first rate pet care, we make our clinic comfortable, kid-friendly, and a very calm environment so your pet can relax in the waiting room and look forward to meeting his or her own St. Louis veterinarian.

      ST. LOUIS HILLS VETERINARY CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 7001 Hampton Avenue, St. Louis MO 63109
      TEL: (314) 353-3444
      St. Louis Hills Veterinary Clinic is staffed by three veterinarians who work to optimize your pet’s health and treatment options through the integration of traditional and holistic medicine. We believe in treating our patients within the context of overall wellbeing.

      BIG BEND VETERINARY CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 2224 South Big Bend Boulevard, St. Louis MO 63117
      TEL: (314) 781-6121
      Big Bend Veterinary Clinic is a full-service animal hospital and welcomes both emergency treatment cases as well as pet patients in need of routine medical, surgical, and dental care.

      WEBSTER GROVES ANIMAL HOSPITAL & URGENT CARE CENTER

      ADDRESS: 8028 Big Bend Boulevard, St. Louis MO 63119
      TEL: (314) 968-4310
      At Webster Groves Animal Hospital & Urgent Care Center, we know how important your pet is to you. That’s why we’re committed to providing the best veterinary care for your faithful companion.

      MY BEST FRIEND VETERINARY CENTER

      ADDRESS: 9350 Olive Boulevard, St. Louis MO 63132
      TEL: (314) 567-5577
      We offer preventative and routine healthcare, surgeries, dentals, and treatment/management of complicated conditions.


      MISSIOURI

      AFFTON // ARNOLD // BELTON // BLUE SPRINGS // CAPE GIRARDEAU // CHESTERFIELD // COLUMBIA // FLORISSANT // GLADSTONE // GRANDVIEW // HAZELWOOD // INDEPENDENCE // JEFFERSON CITY // JOPLIN // KANSAS CITY // KIRKWOOD // LEE’S SUMMIT // LIBERTY // O’FALLON // RAYTOWN // SEDALIA // SPRINGFIELD // ST CHARLES // ST JOSEPH // ST LOUIS // ST PETERS // WENTZVILLE // WILDWOOD

      We cover over 1,700 major cities across all 50 states

      Signs Your Pet Needs Emergency Care

      Has your pet experienced some kind of trauma and in need in emergency care? Here are some of the signs to look when determining whether your pet needs an emergency vet:

      • Pale gums
      • Rapid breathing
      • Weak or rapid pulse
      • Change in body temperature
      • Difficulty standing
      • Apparent paralysis
      • Loss of consciousness
      • Seizures
      • Excessive bleeding

      How To Handle Your Injured Pet

      It is possible that your pet can act aggressively when they’ve been injured. It’s important to be careful how you handle them for their safety and your own.

      For Dogs:

      • Be calm and go slow when approaching.
      • If your dog appears aggressive, get someone to help you.
      • Fashion a makeshift stretcher and carefully lift your dog onto it.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      For Cats:

      • Cover your cats head gently with a towel, to prevent them from biting you.
      • Very carefully, lift your cat into its carrier or a box.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      First Aid Treatment At Home

      Depending on the situation, there are some actions you can take at home to stabalize your pet before transporting them to an emergency vet.

      Bleeding:

      • If your pet is bleeding externally due to a trauma, apply pressure to the wound quickly and hold it there.
      • If possible, elevate the injury.

      Choking:

      • If your pet is choking on a foreign object, put your fingers in their mouth and try to remove the blockage.
      • If you’re unable to remove the blockage, perform a modified version of the Heimlich manouver by giving a sharp blow to their chest.

      CPR:

      • If your pet is unconcious and unresponsive, you may need to perform CPR.
      • First, check if your pet is breathing and if they have a heartbeat. If you cannot find either, start chest compressions.
      • Perform 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat this until your pet starts breathing on their own again.
      • To give a rescue breath, close your pets mouth and extend their neck to open the airway. Place your mouth over your pets nose and exhale until you see your pets chest rise.
      • Check for a heartbeat every 2 minutes.
      • Continue giving your pet CPR until you reach an emergency vet.