Emergency Vet In Springfield, IL

Looking for an emergency vet in Springfield, IL? Search for your nearest animal hospital below.

      List of Emergency Vets in Springfield, IL

      COBLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 2828 South MacArthur Boulevard, Springfield IL 62704
      TEL: (217) 789-4200
      Our veterinary history was started by J. Porter Coble, DVM in 1941 when he opened Coble Animal Hospital. Now Dr. Franklin Coble and 5 other veterinarians continue to bring award winning service to the Springfield area for pet care.

      LAKETOWN ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 1115 Stevenson Drive, Springfield IL 62703
      TEL: (217) 529-4211
      Laketown Animal Hospital is a small animal hospital located in Central Illinois with six veterinarians on staff. We are family owned and operated and have been in the Springfield area since 1961.

      ANIMAL EMERGENCY CLINIC OF SPRINGFIELD

      ADDRESS: 1333 Wabash Avenue, Suite A, Springfield IL 62704
      TEL: (217) 698-0870
      The Animal Emergency Clinic of Springfield provides emergency and critical care services when needed most. The clinic is supported by the Springfield veterinary community and is operational when most regular veterinary practices are closed.

      PARKWAY VETERINARY CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 506 South Dirksen Parkway, Springfield IL 62703
      TEL: (217) 670-1776
      We are an affordable alternative to pet care in the Springfield, IL area. Dr. Sean Snyder will treat your pet with the latest in veterinary science using compassion and care. Dr. Sean has years of experience treating serious conditions and offering regular pet wellness care.

      BREWER ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 971 Clocktower Drive, Springfield IL 62704
      TEL: (217) 787-9730
      Brewer’s mission is to serve the pet-owning public of Springfield and surrounding communities with progressive, high-quality, and compassionate care, while keeping our prices reasonable.

      SANGAMON AVENUE VETERINARY CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 2525 Sangamon Avenue, Springfield IL 62702
      TEL: (217) 789-0011
      Our veterinary history was started by J. Porter Coble, DVM in 1941 when he opened Coble Animal Hospital. Now Dr. Franklin Coble and 5 other veterinarians continue to bring award winning service to the Springfield area for pet care.

      MYERS ANIMAL CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 400 West Browning Road, Springfield IL 62707
      TEL:  (217) 525-9556
      An animal hospital is a place of care and healing, and we believe that every aspect of our practice should reflect those values. That’s why we work hard to make our animal hospital a calming place where your pet can feel secure and at ease.

      HOPE VETERINARY CARE

      ADDRESS: 4337 Conestoga Drive, Springfield IL 62711
      TEL: (217) 503-4804
      At Hope, we take pride in delivering personalized, compassionate care to our patients and their caretakers in Sangamon County and the surrounding areas.


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      Signs Your Pet Needs Emergency Care

      Has your pet experienced some kind of trauma and in need in emergency care? Here are some of the signs to look when determining whether your pet needs an emergency vet:

      • Pale gums
      • Rapid breathing
      • Weak or rapid pulse
      • Change in body temperature
      • Difficulty standing
      • Apparent paralysis
      • Loss of consciousness
      • Seizures
      • Excessive bleeding

      How To Handle Your Injured Pet

      It is possible that your pet can act aggressively when they’ve been injured. It’s important to be careful how you handle them for their safety and your own.

      For Dogs:

      • Be calm and go slow when approaching.
      • If your dog appears aggressive, get someone to help you.
      • Fashion a makeshift stretcher and carefully lift your dog onto it.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      For Cats:

      • Cover your cats head gently with a towel, to prevent them from biting you.
      • Very carefully, lift your cat into its carrier or a box.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      First Aid Treatment At Home

      Depending on the situation, there are some actions you can take at home to stabalize your pet before transporting them to an emergency vet.

      Bleeding:

      • If your pet is bleeding externally due to a trauma, apply pressure to the wound quickly and hold it there.
      • If possible, elevate the injury.

      Choking:

      • If your pet is choking on a foreign object, put your fingers in their mouth and try to remove the blockage.
      • If you’re unable to remove the blockage, perform a modified version of the Heimlich manouver by giving a sharp blow to their chest.

      CPR:

      • If your pet is unconcious and unresponsive, you may need to perform CPR.
      • First, check if your pet is breathing and if they have a heartbeat. If you cannot find either, start chest compressions.
      • Perform 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat this until your pet starts breathing on their own again.
      • To give a rescue breath, close your pets mouth and extend their neck to open the airway. Place your mouth over your pets nose and exhale until you see your pets chest rise.
      • Check for a heartbeat every 2 minutes.
      • Continue giving your pet CPR until you reach an emergency vet.