Emergency Vet In Salt Lake City, UT

Looking for an emergency vet in Salt Lake City, UT? Search for your nearest animal hospital below.

      List of Emergency Vets in Salt Lake City, UT

      TOWN & COUNTRY VETERINARY HOSPITAL (SALT LAKE CITY)

      ADDRESS: 1220 South State Street, Salt Lake City UT 84111
      TEL: (801) 328-8543
      Town & Country Veterinary Hospital is here to provide outstanding veterinary care to pets in the Salt Lake City area. Our goal is to provide the best available and most up to date medical treatment for your pet. We are constantly learning and improving on all areas of animal care. We hope that your family will consider our team a partner in your pet’s care.

      WASATCH SPRINGS ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 855 Beck Street, Salt Lake City UT 84103
      TEL: (801) 532-1100
      We’re proud to be your veterinarian in Salt Lake City. We are pleased to provide you and your Very Important Pet {VIP} with a pleasant and affordable experience. Our veterinary hospital in Salt Lake City will be honest and straightforward with the variety of veterinary and diagnostic services for your pets. After seeing Dr. Blotter, we want you to have a diagnosis and a reasonable treatment plan every time.

      SUGARHOUSE VET

      ADDRESS: 2206 South McClelland Street, Salt Lake City UT 84106
      TEL: (801) 487-9981
      Our team is committed to educating our clients in how to keep your pets healthy year round, with good nutrition and exercise. We stay on top of the latest advances in veterinarian technology and above all, remember that all animals and pets need to be treated with loving care in every check-up, procedure, or surgery. Click here for a detailed list of the services we provide.

      ADVANCED VETERINARY CARE

      ADDRESS: 1021 East 3300 South Millcreek, Salt Lake City UT 84106
      TEL: (801) 942-3951
      You are not alone when your pet is in need. Your family veterinarian and Advanced Veterinary Care (AVC) are here to help. AVC is a 24-hour specialty referral practice providing sophisticated emergency and critical care, trauma management, surgery, internal medicine, and oncology referral services.

      HOLLADAY VETERINARY HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 4732 Highland Drive, Salt Lake City UT 84117
      TEL: (801) 272-5557
      Located in Salt Lake City, Utah, Holladay Veterinary Hospital is a companion animal veterinary hospital that specializes in the care and treatment of dogs and cats. Our experienced and skilled team of veterinary doctors warmly welcomes you to our veterinary facility.

      REDWOOD VETERINARY HOSPITAL (SALT LAKE CITY)

      ADDRESS: 4958 Redwood Road, Salt Lake City UT 84123
      TEL: (801) 966-3974
      We love our hospital. We work hard to make it the best hospital in the state of Utah and the best hospital in Salt Lake City. Proving you are the best is difficult and we know we really cannot do that especially in a city of wonderful veterinary hospitals; however, we can say that we are one of only ten Salt Lake City veterinary hospitals that has achieved accredited status with the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA).

      VCA COTTONWOOD ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 6360 Highland Drive, Salt Lake City UT 84121
      TEL: (801) 278-3367
      VCA Cottonwood Animal Hospital is a full service animal hospital treating dogs and cats in Salt Lake City, Murray, Cottonwood Heights, Holladay, and Sandy. VCA Cottonwood Animal Hospital has 15 licensed veterinarians, treating all types of pets and animals. Your pet’s health and well being is very important to us and we will take every step to give your pet the best possible care.


      UTAH

      AMERICAN FORK // BOUNTIFUL // CEDAR CITY // CLEARFIELD // CLINTON // COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS // DRAPER // FARMINGTON // KAYSVILLE // LAYTON // LOGAN // MIDVALE // MILLCREEK // OGDEN // OREM // PLEASANT GROVE // PROVO // RIVERTON // SALT LAKE CITY // SANDY // SARATOGA SPRINGS // SOUTH JORDAN // ST GEORGE // SYRACUSE // TAYLORSVILLE // TOOELE // WEST JORDAN // WEST VALLEY CITY

      We cover over 1,700 major cities across all 50 states

      Signs Your Pet Needs Emergency Care

      Has your pet experienced some kind of trauma and in need in emergency care? Here are some of the signs to look when determining whether your pet needs an emergency vet:

      • Pale gums
      • Rapid breathing
      • Weak or rapid pulse
      • Change in body temperature
      • Difficulty standing
      • Apparent paralysis
      • Loss of consciousness
      • Seizures
      • Excessive bleeding

      How To Handle Your Injured Pet

      It is possible that your pet can act aggressively when they’ve been injured. It’s important to be careful how you handle them for their safety and your own.

      For Dogs:

      • Be calm and go slow when approaching.
      • If your dog appears aggressive, get someone to help you.
      • Fashion a makeshift stretcher and carefully lift your dog onto it.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      For Cats:

      • Cover your cats head gently with a towel, to prevent them from biting you.
      • Very carefully, lift your cat into its carrier or a box.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      First Aid Treatment At Home

      Depending on the situation, there are some actions you can take at home to stabalize your pet before transporting them to an emergency vet.

      Bleeding:

      • If your pet is bleeding externally due to a trauma, apply pressure to the wound quickly and hold it there.
      • If possible, elevate the injury.

      Choking:

      • If your pet is choking on a foreign object, put your fingers in their mouth and try to remove the blockage.
      • If you’re unable to remove the blockage, perform a modified version of the Heimlich manouver by giving a sharp blow to their chest.

      CPR:

      • If your pet is unconcious and unresponsive, you may need to perform CPR.
      • First, check if your pet is breathing and if they have a heartbeat. If you cannot find either, start chest compressions.
      • Perform 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat this until your pet starts breathing on their own again.
      • To give a rescue breath, close your pets mouth and extend their neck to open the airway. Place your mouth over your pets nose and exhale until you see your pets chest rise.
      • Check for a heartbeat every 2 minutes.
      • Continue giving your pet CPR until you reach an emergency vet.