Emergency Vets in Suffolk, VA

Looking for an emergency vet in Suffolk, VA? Search for your nearest animal hospital below.


      List of Emergency Vets in Suffolk, VA

      TIDEWATER ANIMAL CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 542 East Constance Road, Suffolk VA 23434
      TEL: (757) 925-2011
      We are glad to take care of all dogs and cats, of all shapes and sizes. We also see the occasional hamster or other small mammal, but may refer their care to other veterinarians, who specialize in their care. We truly want the best for our patients, and sometimes that means a different doctor.

      SUFFOLK ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 1232 Holland Road, Suffolk VA 23434
      TEL: (757) 539-1385
      If you live in Suffolk or the surrounding area and need a trusted veterinarian to care for your pets – look no further. Dr. Amber Carr is a licensed veterinarian, treating both cats and dogs. In addition to being licensed by the state of Virginia, Suffolk Animal Hospital is an AAHA-Accredited Veterinary Hospital and the Local’s Choice for Best Veterinarian and Animal Hospital in 2015 and 2017.

      NANSEMOND VETERINARY CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 110 Kensington Boulevard, Suffolk VA 23434
      TEL: (757) 539-6371
      Nansemond Veterinary Clinic was founded in 1938 as Kress Animal Hospital. Originally located on North Main Street in Suffolk, Virginia, the animal hospital adopted its new name when it moved to its current location on Kensington Blvd in 1990.

      ACADEMY ANIMAL CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 3372 Pruden Boulevard, Suffolk VA 23434
      TEL: (757) 934-2273
      Academy Animal Care in Suffolk, Virginia is a full service companion animal hospital. It is our commitment to provide quality veterinary care throughout the life of your pet. Our services and facilities are designed to assist in routine preventative care for young, healthy pets; early detection and treatment of disease as your pet ages; and complete medical and surgical care as necessary during his or her lifetime.

      NORTH SUFFOLK ANIMAL CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 2897 Bridge Road, Suite A, Suffolk VA 23435
      TEL: (757) 483-3800
      We have three veterinarians on staff supported by several licensed veterinary technicians, veterinary assistants, and receptionists to provide our patients with exceptional care.

      BENNETTS CREEK VETERINARY CARE

      ADDRESS: 3511 Bridge Road, Suffolk VA 23435
      TEL: (757) 483-5990
      We are a full service veterinary clinic located in North Suffolk in the Hampton Roads area of Southeastern Virginia. We have a 3000 square foot facility offering separate entrances and waiting rooms for our canine and feline patients.

      THE COVE CENTER OF VETERINARY EXPERTISE

      ADDRESS: 6550 Hampton Roads Parkway, #113, Suffolk VA 23435
      TEL: (757) 935-9111
      When your pet needs emergency care or advanced treatment from a board-certified veterinary specialist in cardiology, surgery, or critical care, you can count on The Center Of Veterinary Expertise—The COVE—24 hours a day, every day of the year. Suffolk’s only animal ER is conveniently located to serve pet owners and primary care veterinarian throughout the Suffolk, VA area and surrounding cities including Hampton, Portsmouth, Chesapeake, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach.
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      Signs Your Pet Needs Emergency Care

      Has your pet experienced some kind of trauma and in need in emergency care? Here are some of the signs to look when determining whether your pet needs an emergency vet:

      • Pale gums
      • Rapid breathing
      • Weak or rapid pulse
      • Change in body temperature
      • Difficulty standing
      • Apparent paralysis
      • Loss of consciousness
      • Seizures
      • Excessive bleeding

      How to Handle Your Injured Pet

      It is possible that your pet can act aggressively when they’ve been injured. It’s important to be careful how you handle them for their safety and your own.

      For Dogs:

      • Be calm and go slow when approaching.
      • If your dog appears aggressive, get someone to help you.
      • Fashion a makeshift stretcher and carefully lift your dog onto it.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      For Cats:

      • Cover your cats head gently with a towel, to prevent them from biting you.
      • Very carefully, lift your cat into its carrier or a box.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      First Aid Treatment At Home

      Depending on the situation, there are some actions you can take at home to stabilize your pet before transporting them to an emergency vet.

      Bleeding:

      • If your pet is bleeding externally due to a trauma, apply pressure to the wound quickly and hold it there.
      • If possible, elevate the injury.

      Choking:

      • If your pet is choking on a foreign object, put your fingers in their mouth and try to remove the blockage.
      • If you’re unable to remove the blockage, perform a modified version of the Heimlich maneuver by giving a sharp blow to their chest.

      CPR:

      • If your pet is unconscious and unresponsive, you may need to perform CPR.
      • First, check if your pet is breathing and if they have a heartbeat. If you cannot find either, start chest compressions.
      • Perform 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat this until your pet starts breathing on their own again.
      • To give a rescue breath, close your pets mouth and extend their neck to open the airway. Place your mouth over your pets nose and exhale until you see your pets chest rise.
      • Check for a heartbeat every 2 minutes.
      • Continue giving your pet CPR until you reach an emergency vet.