Emergency Vet In Lynnwood, WA

Looking for an emergency vet in Lynnwood, WA? Search for your nearest animal hospital below.

      List of Emergency Vets in Lynnwood, WA

      ANIMAL HOSPITAL OF LYNNWOOD

      ADDRESS: 19503 56th Avenue West, Lynnwood WA 98036
      TEL: (425) 771-6300
      Animal Hospital of Lynnwood is a full-service animal hospital and welcomes both emergency treatment cases as well as pet patients in need of routine medical, surgical, and dental care. Dr. Tejinder Sodhi has years of experience treating serious conditions and offering regular pet wellness care.

      BANFIELD PET HOSPITAL (LYNNWOOD)

      ADDRESS: 18820 Highway 99, Lynnwood WA 98036
      TEL: (425) 744-0730
      The Banfield Pet Hospital in Lynnwood, Washington loves your pet (almost) as much as you do by providing quality preventive pet health care. From nose-to-tail veterinary medical exams to vaccinations, microchipping, dental care and surgery, you’ll find the health care your pet deserves at your neighborhood Banfield Pet Hospital.

      VETERINARY SPECIALTY CENTER OF SEATTLE

      ADDRESS: 20115 44th Avenue West, Lynnwood WA 98036
      TEL: (425) 800-0930
      Veterinary Specialty Center of Seattle in Lynnwood offers 24-hour emergency and critical care for your pet. Our AAHA-accredited team includes emergency and board-certified veterinary specialists whose approach to veterinary medicine enables them to work together in support of our mission to improve the quality of life for pets and their owners.

      HELPING HANDS VETERINARY CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 18415 33rd Avenue West, Suite R, Lynnwood WA 98037
      TEL: (425) 296-9448
      Helping Hands Veterinary Clinic is a full service veterinary hospital that blends traditional and holistic medicine to provide comprehensive pet healthcare services in Lynwood, WA. We offer a fear-free approach and are proud to be AAHA accredited. Our veterinarians offer a wide variety of medical, surgical and dental services.

      VCA LYNNWOOD VETERINARY CENTER

      ADDRESS: 4426 168th Street SW, Lynnwood WA 98037
      TEL: (425) 742-7387
      As loving, loyal family members, pets deserve to be treated with respect, dignity and compassion. We believe in taking care of your pets the way we want our own pets to be cared for. Our highly competent doctors and staff will always take the time to give a thorough examination and appropriate treatment, and will answer whatever questions or concerns you may have.

      VCA ALDERWOOD COMPANION ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 19511 24th Avenue West, Lynnwood WA 98036
      TEL: (425) 775-7655
      Our hospital is open seven days a week and offers a wealth of knowledge with our four doctors. We offer routine care and surgical services every day of the week. Our doctors work together to provide the best care for our patients.

      NORTHPOINTE ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 2902 164th Street SW, Suite D4, Lynnwood WA 98087
      TEL: (425) 903-8123
      Northpointe Animal Hospital is a cutting edge veterinary practice in Lynnwood, Washington providing the latest in pet medicine. We are the leading PAW Plan hospital in the area, and all of our employees are Fear Free certified. We strive to offer not only sound advice, but also optimal veterinary care, thus allowing the enjoyment of your companion for a maximum number of years.


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      Signs Your Pet Needs Emergency Care

      Has your pet experienced some kind of trauma and in need in emergency care? Here are some of the signs to look when determining whether your pet needs an emergency vet:

      • Pale gums
      • Rapid breathing
      • Weak or rapid pulse
      • Change in body temperature
      • Difficulty standing
      • Apparent paralysis
      • Loss of consciousness
      • Seizures
      • Excessive bleeding

      How To Handle Your Injured Pet

      It is possible that your pet can act aggressively when they’ve been injured. It’s important to be careful how you handle them for their safety and your own.

      For Dogs:

      • Be calm and go slow when approaching.
      • If your dog appears aggressive, get someone to help you.
      • Fashion a makeshift stretcher and carefully lift your dog onto it.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      For Cats:

      • Cover your cats head gently with a towel, to prevent them from biting you.
      • Very carefully, lift your cat into its carrier or a box.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      First Aid Treatment At Home

      Depending on the situation, there are some actions you can take at home to stabalize your pet before transporting them to an emergency vet.

      Bleeding:

      • If your pet is bleeding externally due to a trauma, apply pressure to the wound quickly and hold it there.
      • If possible, elevate the injury.

      Choking:

      • If your pet is choking on a foreign object, put your fingers in their mouth and try to remove the blockage.
      • If you’re unable to remove the blockage, perform a modified version of the Heimlich manouver by giving a sharp blow to their chest.

      CPR:

      • If your pet is unconcious and unresponsive, you may need to perform CPR.
      • First, check if your pet is breathing and if they have a heartbeat. If you cannot find either, start chest compressions.
      • Perform 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat this until your pet starts breathing on their own again.
      • To give a rescue breath, close your pets mouth and extend their neck to open the airway. Place your mouth over your pets nose and exhale until you see your pets chest rise.
      • Check for a heartbeat every 2 minutes.
      • Continue giving your pet CPR until you reach an emergency vet.