Emergency Vet In Dallas, TX

Looking for an emergency vet in Dallas, TX? Search for your nearest animal hospital below.

      List of Emergency Vets in Dallas, TX

      RUTHERFORD VETERINARY HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 924 S Haskell Avenue, Dallas TX 75223
      TEL: (214) 826-4166
      Rutherford Veterinary Hospital is proud to adhere to the very highest standards of veterinary medicine in the industry. We aspire to provide the most exceptional veterinary care possible, ensuring each one of our patients receives the treatment they need no matter what! We are the oldest operating animal hospital in Dallas. Located near downtown, we’ve been caring for pets in East Dallas and Lakewood communities since we first opened our doors in 1924.

      DALLAS ANIMAL EMERGENCY

      ADDRESS: 3337 N. Fitzhugh Avenue, Dallas TX 75204
      TEL: (214) 520-2222
      At Dallas Animal Emergency, it is our goal to provide the highest quality compassionate care for your pets when your primary care veterinarian is unavailable. Conveniently located in the heart of Dallas, Texas, we are open nights, weekends, and holidays to examine, diagnose, and provide treatment for your pet when they are sick or having other unexpected emergencies.

      HEAL VETERINARY HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 4509 Lemmon Avenue, Dallas TX 75219
      TEL: (214) 329-9454
      HEAL Veterinary Hospital is a full-service general care facility that offers a broad spectrum of procedures. We provide hard-to-find advanced services including acupuncture, underwater and land treadmill rehabilitation, exercise conditioning, weight loss support, educational classes, nutritional counseling and advanced dental services.

      HILLSIDE VETERINARY CLINIC (DALLAS)

      ADDRESS: 6150 E Mockingbird Lane, Dallas TX 75214
      TEL: (214) 824-0397
      Hillside Veterinary Clinic is a full-service companion animal hospital providing a broad spectrum of treatments and procedures. Its entire staff is committed to superior veterinary care throughout the life of your pet and quality client satisfaction to you, the pet owner.

      PRESTON CENTER ANIMAL CLINIC

      ADDRESS: 5934 W. Northwest Highway, Dallas TX 75225
      TEL: (214) 368-3592
      We are a privately-owned full-service veterinary clinic offering preventative care, dentistry, surgery, and treatment of sick and injured dogs and cats. Whether you’re a first-time pet owner or a lifelong animal lover, you’ll find this website to be a valuable addition to your bag of tricks.

      MEDVET

      ADDRESS: 11333 North Central Expressway, Dallas TX 75243
      TEL: (972) 994-9110
      Welcome to MedVet. We are a family of emergency and specialty veterinary hospitals committed to providing exceptional care for you and your pet. Our board-certified specialists and highly trained emergency veterinarians work closely with you and your family veterinarian to provide the best possible care for your dog or cat.

      WHITEROCK ANIMAL HOSPITAL

      ADDRESS: 11414 East Northwest Highway, Dallas TX 75218
      TEL: (214) 838-8248
      We all live in a hectic, sometimes frantic world, where we try to stay organized but things just don’t go as planned. At White Rock Animal Hospital, we do not require your pet to have an appointment to be seen during regular office hours. Drop offs are encouraged, as it gives our staff time to fully evaluate your pets medical issues and complete all necessary procedures that are indicated.

      CHASTAIN VETERINARY MEDICAL GROUP (DALLAS)

      ADDRESS: 6060 LBJ Freeway, Dallas TX 75240
      TEL: (972) 239-1309
      Welcome to Chastain Veterinary Medical Group! We are dedicated to your pet’s health and happiness. For about 20 years now we’ve been providing cutting edge veterinary care mixed with old-fashioned compassion for pets in the North Dallas area of Texas.


      TEXAS

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      Signs Your Pet Needs Emergency Care

      Has your pet experienced some kind of trauma and in need in emergency care? Here are some of the signs to look when determining whether your pet needs an emergency vet:

      • Pale gums
      • Rapid breathing
      • Weak or rapid pulse
      • Change in body temperature
      • Difficulty standing
      • Apparent paralysis
      • Loss of consciousness
      • Seizures
      • Excessive bleeding

      How To Handle Your Injured Pet

      It is possible that your pet can act aggressively when they’ve been injured. It’s important to be careful how you handle them for their safety and your own.

      For Dogs:

      • Be calm and go slow when approaching.
      • If your dog appears aggressive, get someone to help you.
      • Fashion a makeshift stretcher and carefully lift your dog onto it.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      For Cats:

      • Cover your cats head gently with a towel, to prevent them from biting you.
      • Very carefully, lift your cat into its carrier or a box.
      • Support their neck and back as you move them in case of spinal injuries.

      First Aid Treatment At Home

      Depending on the situation, there are some actions you can take at home to stabalize your pet before transporting them to an emergency vet.

      Bleeding:

      • If your pet is bleeding externally due to a trauma, apply pressure to the wound quickly and hold it there.
      • If possible, elevate the injury.

      Choking:

      • If your pet is choking on a foreign object, put your fingers in their mouth and try to remove the blockage.
      • If you’re unable to remove the blockage, perform a modified version of the Heimlich manouver by giving a sharp blow to their chest.

      CPR:

      • If your pet is unconcious and unresponsive, you may need to perform CPR.
      • First, check if your pet is breathing and if they have a heartbeat. If you cannot find either, start chest compressions.
      • Perform 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat this until your pet starts breathing on their own again.
      • To give a rescue breath, close your pets mouth and extend their neck to open the airway. Place your mouth over your pets nose and exhale until you see your pets chest rise.
      • Check for a heartbeat every 2 minutes.
      • Continue giving your pet CPR until you reach an emergency vet.